Fishing The Fly Forum, based in Aberdeenshire,  Scotland

Jonathan Kerr

hiking boots for wading...
« on: February 21, 2014, 19:05:20 PM »
has anyone tried this for our local rivers...if so how did you get on?

Ive read quite a bit on the big forum about it with some saying it could be the way to go.

Im in the market for some new boots, so just weighing up my options.  I do a lot of walking up and down the river banks so was thinking some cheapo hiking boots may actually be pretty good if they are sized right of course.

Jonathan

Euan Innes

Re: hiking boots for wading...
« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2014, 20:46:20 PM »
I use hiking boots to wade in and have not had any problems. I bought them to float tube in but ised them on the Dee last year no bother.
HOWEVER, on slippy rocks ffs take care. Real wading boots do make life easier but are a whole lot more expensive. I am looking at buying some this year but for tubing and walking in to remote lochs hiking boots are just fine.
Bet you're confused now!

 :z1
Living with deep, full breaths is the way of the trout. Fish, it seems, are the ultimate teachers in breathing.
RC Cone

Noel kelly

Re: hiking boots for wading...
« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2014, 22:13:15 PM »
Bison boots 30 and they seem good.

Jonathan Kerr

Re: hiking boots for wading...
« Reply #3 on: February 22, 2014, 07:48:22 AM »
thanks chaps. A friend bought the bison chest waders....they honestly looked like a hail storm would cut holes through them..but he's on his third season with them!

Ive seen the bison boots online, and also the sonic sk3 look a decent cheaper option with rubber sole. I was just curious to see if any others are using the hiking boot option.  I know I could probably pick up a cheap big pair of hikers from sports direct and didn't want to think I was missing a trick paying 100 odd for my usual 'proper' boots when the hikers could be the way forward!

Hmm...maybe another pair of vision hoppers as I liked them, or the new loikka's would be the way forward....probably a lot safer and easier to get on and off too!

Euan Innes

Re: hiking boots for wading...
« Reply #4 on: February 22, 2014, 17:34:56 PM »
Mine are Hi-Tec suede and cordura breathables and were 30.
Don't know about the breathable bit under water though!

 :z1
Living with deep, full breaths is the way of the trout. Fish, it seems, are the ultimate teachers in breathing.
RC Cone

Duncan Inglis

Re: hiking boots for wading...
« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2014, 20:29:10 PM »
If you go down the hiking boot root I would get some studs in the sole to try and give you some grip on slime covered stones when wading.

Colin Sunley

Re: hiking boots for wading...
« Reply #6 on: February 23, 2014, 19:57:52 PM »
I've been looking for a pair myself, I guess I never considered a pair of Hiking boots as an option, And certainly a cheaper option from what I've researched so far on branded names,  There cant be much difference if you stud the Sole's?

Rob Brownfield

Re: hiking boots for wading...
« Reply #7 on: February 24, 2014, 08:02:01 AM »
I have to say that I would not use hiking boots purely on the basis that the soles are not designed for use in water/on wet rocks. I would imagine that there would be issues with rotting stitching too if not dried thourghly after use?

You can get Airflos for 30 and Hardwear for 50.

http://www.fishtec.co.uk/tackle.cfm/fly/wading-boots/40/6015

For float tubibg I use a cheap pair of canvas "pumps". More comfortable and easy to slip on and off.
Ok, I admit it, I quite like this salmon fishing lark....

Jonathan Kerr

Re: hiking boots for wading...
« Reply #8 on: February 24, 2014, 10:39:30 AM »
most cheap wading boots...like those you linked to rob tend to be felt sole. For me that is a no no....I clamber over a lots of hills/bogs/wet muddy areas in a season, sometimes fairly long distances, and I've found felt soles to be fairly useless for this...even with studs. Each to their own I guess, and I think it does depend on how and where you fish.

I think the only way I will truly know if hiking boots (with studs) are any use is if I try! perhaps this season..maybe another.  Thanks to those who have responded, particularly those who have actually tried hiking boots as an alternative and given their opinion as to how you they got on with them  :z16

I think fishermen are ripped off to often, as are enthusiasts in many other 'specialist' sports,  and as someone with limited funds these days I think its good to explore ways I can save significant amounts of money on my many hobbies....without significant reductions in quality of experience of course!

My other main hobby...surfing, is also going the same way....a new wetsuit of good brand...now costs upwards of 400! thats a lot for a bit of rubber made in a factory for pennies!

J

Ben_D

Re: hiking boots for wading...
« Reply #9 on: February 24, 2014, 19:48:35 PM »
For walking, felt is bollocks but by far the best for me once in the water.  If walking any distance or fishing from grass banks I use studded rubber boots which are not that great on a rocky bed.  For the sort of fishing you are talking about, try some cheap hiking boots but keep some felts for fishing the rivers would be my advice.  I know how bad my studded rubber boots are in certain pools on the Don and that is supposed to be a rubber sole designed for the job, I can only imagine something designed for use on land would be even worse.

Ideally, you need two pairs of boots.

Cheers

Ben

Jeff Donovan

Re: hiking boots for wading...
« Reply #10 on: February 24, 2014, 23:42:20 PM »
Snowbee used to do a reasonably priced wading boot for all types of wading/walking/fishing. The Rockhopper boot priced at around 55. They also used to do a wading boot accessory, the Rockhopper wader grips which could be attached to whatever boot was being worn.

 I've just "Googled" their website and the grips retail for 9:99
« Last Edit: February 25, 2014, 00:04:48 AM by Taffy1 »
Close to the edge down by the river.......... Yes.

Colin Sunley

Re: hiking boots for wading...
« Reply #11 on: February 25, 2014, 00:32:31 AM »
Ideally, you need two pairs of boots.

Or perhaps Not,  ?? :z8

I was searching for Felt Sole overshoes and this popped up, Seems to have the best of both worlds,
Not sure if you get then over here,  but that will be my next search,

http://www.korkers.com/footwear/fishing.html

http://www.korkers.com/technology/?p=omnitrax

Rob Brownfield

Re: hiking boots for wading...
« Reply #12 on: February 25, 2014, 08:27:54 AM »
I was searching for Felt Sole overshoes and this popped up, Seems to have the best of both worlds,
Not sure if you get then over here,  but that will be my next search,

Oh if only it were that simple! I have Orvis Riverguard Korkers for the very reasons started in previous posts, I wanted something I could walk in, and then fish in. The boot itself is great, the idea of swapping soles, not so great.

I use the Omnitrax sole for walking, and managed to get a felt sole for wading (now worn out). Now, if you have walked through bog, musd, sand etc, removing the soles is an unpleasent job, especially on a cold morning. You have to remove the boot and wash it off first. Taking the sole off is not too bad, putting the new sole on is a #### of a job! You also need the special tool which invariably gets lost. If the boot is not clean, then the replacement sole just will not fit. Any grit in the slots is a pain and near impossible to remove without a dubbing needle and a tap.


Having said that, the Orvis version has a slightly different fitting to the Korkers version and looks easier to change. You can still get the Orvis version according to the website, but you cannot get the soles.

http://www.orvis.co.uk/store/product.aspx?pf_id=3R40
Ok, I admit it, I quite like this salmon fishing lark....

 




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