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Catman

Re: General Knowledge - Fly Fishing
« Reply #255 on: February 17, 2011, 15:24:27 PM »
OK her goes two part question;

What is the Latin name for the Mayfly & how many spiecies are there in Britain alone?

Alex

Peter McCallum

Re: General Knowledge - Fly Fishing
« Reply #256 on: February 17, 2011, 16:07:27 PM »
Ahhhhhhhh now di you mean the mayfly as we know it or as the americans would know it

Catman

Re: General Knowledge - Fly Fishing
« Reply #257 on: February 17, 2011, 16:16:41 PM »
That would be the Latin name used in the UK and the amount of different spiecies in the UK.
I did put Britain in the original question as a hint. :wink :z4 :z4 :z4

Jim Eddie

Re: General Knowledge - Fly Fishing
« Reply #258 on: February 17, 2011, 17:37:33 PM »
Ephemeroptera ?

 51 species ?

 :z18

Jim
"Because in a world where most men seem to spend their lives doing what they hate, my fishing is at once an endless source of delight and an act of small rebellion."

Peter McCallum

Re: General Knowledge - Fly Fishing
« Reply #259 on: February 17, 2011, 18:13:57 PM »
If we're talking about 'our' Mayfly the I think theres 3 Ephemera Vulgata, Ephemera Danica & Ephemera Lineata though I'm not sure if those are spelt right

Catman

Re: General Knowledge - Fly Fishing
« Reply #260 on: February 17, 2011, 18:25:18 PM »
Sorry uys had to nip out to eat, Jim you are spot on 51 Species of Ephemeroptera in Britain.

Mayflies used to be known as Dayflies due to their short life cycle, also, their current name is due to the appearance of the adults at the same time as the Hawthorn blooms. The hawthorn was once called the 'mayflower'.

So there you go...over to you Jim


Jim Eddie

Re: General Knowledge - Fly Fishing
« Reply #261 on: February 17, 2011, 18:38:35 PM »
If anyone is interested here are the UK species

http://www.ephemeroptera.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/9316/

Thjere are over 2000 worldwide.

 :z18

Jim
"Because in a world where most men seem to spend their lives doing what they hate, my fishing is at once an endless source of delight and an act of small rebellion."

Jim Eddie

Re: General Knowledge - Fly Fishing
« Reply #262 on: February 17, 2011, 18:53:24 PM »
Name this trout loch

Was once part of a tidal Estuary used by the Romans then Vikings.

It is in a Royal Burgh conferred on the residents by Mary queen of Scots in 16th centuary

On the East side is the ancient Chapel of St Mary founded in 911 AD

 :z18

Jim 

"Because in a world where most men seem to spend their lives doing what they hate, my fishing is at once an endless source of delight and an act of small rebellion."

Hamish Young

Re: General Knowledge - Fly Fishing
« Reply #263 on: February 17, 2011, 18:56:01 PM »
Would it be:

The Loch of Strathbeg :?

:z3
“When tired at last, he sat on the bank, while the river still chattered on to him, a babbling procession of the best stories in the world, sent from the heart of the earth to be told at last to the insatiable sea.”

Jim Eddie

Re: General Knowledge - Fly Fishing
« Reply #264 on: February 17, 2011, 19:06:15 PM »
It would indeed Hamish :wink

Last bastion of the Comyns when Edward  Bruce (Roberts Brother) Harried Buchan

Former home of the Lairds of Haddo whose 17th centuary  home is now a farmhouse.

at 550 acres the largest dune loch in the UK

and now unable to fish it largely thaks to the RSPB  :mad

 :z18

Jim
"Because in a world where most men seem to spend their lives doing what they hate, my fishing is at once an endless source of delight and an act of small rebellion."

Hamish Young

Re: General Knowledge - Fly Fishing
« Reply #265 on: February 17, 2011, 19:15:40 PM »
Which loch is this:

I was once famed for my Sea Trout and Salmon fishing but today am hardly fished at all.

I was syndicated in the late 1980's

One of the largest salmon farms in the UK was set up in the sea loch where my river flows to the sea.

I am probably the perfect example of why Salmon farming should be banned.

Which loch am I :?

:z3

“When tired at last, he sat on the bank, while the river still chattered on to him, a babbling procession of the best stories in the world, sent from the heart of the earth to be told at last to the insatiable sea.”

Jim Eddie

Re: General Knowledge - Fly Fishing
« Reply #266 on: February 17, 2011, 19:19:30 PM »
Loch Maree ?

 :z18

Jim
"Because in a world where most men seem to spend their lives doing what they hate, my fishing is at once an endless source of delight and an act of small rebellion."

Peter McCallum

Re: General Knowledge - Fly Fishing
« Reply #267 on: February 17, 2011, 19:29:52 PM »
Sorry uys had to nip out to eat, Jim you are spot on 51 Species of Ephemeroptera in Britain.

Mayflies used to be known as Dayflies due to their short life cycle, also, their current name is due to the appearance of the adults at the same time as the Hawthorn blooms. The hawthorn was once called the 'mayflower'.

So there you go...over to you Jim



Thats what I meant in my previous post. The name  'Mayfly' in britain is generally taken to mean the large species of Ephemera - danica, etc.. Dayflies are the various ephemeroptera. In the States 'Mayfly' has the same meaning as 'Dayflies'

Hamish Young

Re: General Knowledge - Fly Fishing
« Reply #268 on: February 17, 2011, 19:57:42 PM »
Loch Maree ?

 :z18

Jim

It's a good guess..... but it's not right  :z10

:z3
“When tired at last, he sat on the bank, while the river still chattered on to him, a babbling procession of the best stories in the world, sent from the heart of the earth to be told at last to the insatiable sea.”

Catman

Re: General Knowledge - Fly Fishing
« Reply #269 on: February 17, 2011, 20:08:31 PM »
Thats what I meant in my previous post. The name  'Mayfly' in britain is generally taken to mean the large species of Ephemera - danica, etc.. Dayflies are the various ephemeroptera. In the States 'Mayfly' has the same meaning as 'Dayflies'

Mayflies - Ephemeroptera
Mayflies are insects which belong in Order Ephemeroptera (from the Greek ephemeros = "short-lived", pteron = "wing", referring to the short life span of adults). The life cycle for the mayfly begins when after a small number of weeks, the egg changes into a nymph.  It in point of fact requires an added year before they mature.

Mayflies Family of flies also known as March Brown,  Blue winged olive, Epherma danica, Blue winged olive imago, Blue winged olve dun and Baetis spinner

As you may be aware, there are various names to the different types of mayflies & different names including their emergence stage according to species:  - Stone Clinger, Hexagenia, Slit Burrower, March Brown,  Blue winged olive, Epherma danica, Blue winged olive imago, Blue winged olve dun and Baetis spinner to name just a few.  All these has a unique way of life with the intention of matching its environments as you would expect.  But it really it is as a young nymph that every one of those species adapts and creates lifestyles to suit their very own environments. When it turns into an adult, its single aim in life is always to reproduce. This good-looking living thing may well be in this world just for a few hours, certainly not more than 24 hours. Therefore after they've mated, the female lays her eggs and dies becoming what is named spent.  The entire sequence then begins another time.

Mayfly Short Life-time

It is very fascinating to note of the fact that short life span of the mayfly is represented in it's name in a mixture of languages all over the world and interprets literally as one-day-fly!  A few examples of this are - German Eintagsfliege, Dutch eendagsvlieg, Slovenian enodnevnica, Swedish dagslända, Danish and Norwegian døgnflue, Polish jętka jednodniówka, Finnish päivänkorento, Bulgarian еднодневка, and Greek εφήμερος.

This is according to a British entomologist. Not American.

Alex
       

 




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